Cambridge Residents’ Parking: Frequently Asked Questions

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Q: What are the costs of residents’ parking in Cambridge?
A: Residents’ parking schemes are self-funding, ie they are costed to pay for themselves. At present, participating in a residents’ parking scheme starts at just over £1 a week per permit. There are discounts for less polluting vehicles. Each household can buy up to three permits.

Schemes that include weekends and/ or evenings are more expensive than ones running 9-5 Monday to Friday or less.  There is usually a joining fee to cover set-up costs but the Greater Cambridgeshire Partnership is currently funding these.

Q: What about visitors?
A: Residents may purchase up to 20 visitor permits a year, which allow visitors to park for up to 5 days at a cost of £2.40 a day or part of a day. Anyone living in the area of a scheme can apply for visitor permits for their guests. You do not have to have a residents’ parking permit to have a visitors’ permit.

Businesses can apply for permits.

Blue badge holders are entitled to one free annual visitor’s permit.

Q: What happens if I have carers or medical visitors who need to park?
A: There is a free medical permit scheme for people who need visits from relatives or health professionals. Your doctor will need to assess your infirmity or lack of mobility and provide an estimate of the number and frequency of official visits required. There are dispensations for medical professionals who attend emergencies or who carry special equipment.

Q: What happens if I have people working on my house who need to park?
A: Tradespeople are able to purchase one or two permits for the area in which they are working.

Q: What about shops/ schools/ churches?
A: It is possible to include short-stay bays for community facilities as part of a scheme. They should be incorporated at the time the scheme is developed.

Q: Does a residents’ parking scheme guarantee a space?
A: It does not guarantee a space, but it gives residents a better chance of getting a space.

Q: Do you have to join if there’s a scheme in your street?

A: Only if you want to park in one of the on-street residents’ bays. If you have your own private parking, say on a drive, you need not purchase a residents’ permit.

Q: To whom should I report illegal parking?
A: Ring the County Council’s Civil Enforcement team on 01223 727 900. For dangerous parking, eg obstruction, parking on school zig-zags, or in bus lanes and cycle lanes, contact the police on 101.

Q: I am in a car club. Surely I would not have to pay £50+ a year when I only park in the street occasionally?

A: Residents who occasionally use car club vehicles can purchase visitor’s permits, or use the Pay & Display or short-stay bays if they are close enough to be convenient. Some schemes include spaces specifically for car club vehicles.

See the County Council website for more information including application forms for permits,  and the residents’ parking policy.

Queen Edith’s: new parking restrictions advertised today

dOUBLE-YELLOWSThe County Council has today advertised new parking restrictions to protect junctions in Nightingale Avenue and in the Hills Road area. Double yellow lines are proposed, to ban parking on corners in Nightingale Avenue, Blinco Grove, Rock Road, Cavendish and Hills Avenues. You can see plans here:

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and here is a scan of the Traffic Regulation Order: PRINT-SERVER-1_Canon020_0739_001

The restrictions have already been proposed to residents as part of an informal consultation. Now the County has advertised making a Traffic Regulation Order which if approved would allow the restrictions to come into force. If you wish to comment for or against the restrictions, please email the County Council by 21st November: [email protected], quoting reference PRO160.

 

New yellow lines to mark junctions

Cars parked on junctions is a frequent complaint. The Highway Code says, in its Waiting and Parking section:

DO NOT PARK opposite or within 10 metres (32 feet) of a junction, except in an authorised parking space

However, this follows a section of fiercer prohibitions starting YOU MUST NOT, so the junction parking words are advisory only. A traffic regulation order for parking restrictons at a junction, followed by yellow lines, would be required to make it an offence to park there.

The County Council has identified several junctions in the Hills Road area and are proposing new parking restrictions which would do just that. These would be yellow lines around the junctions to prevent cars parking too close, blocking the view for traffic and pedestrians and in some cases, obstructing dropped kerbs.

Residents living close to the junctions should have received letters and plans of what is being proposed. This is an informal consultation: if there is general assent then the Council will proceed to advertise these formally. Here are the plans:

Edendale Close and Hinton Ave     Hills Ave and Cavendish Ave     Blinco Grove and Magnolia Close     Blinco Grove and Rock Road

After a year of talking, the County Council unveils its Parking Plan

QUEEN EDITH CHAPEL THIS WEDNESDAY

Most residents of Queen Edith’s will know that parking is a big problem in this area. Lib Dem councillors have for many years been calling for action from Conservative-run Cambridgeshire County Council, the council responsible for parking management and highways.

Last summer the County agreed to set up a parking review group, to look at all of the south of the city, including Queen Edith’s, Trumpington, Romsey and some streets in Coleridge. Cllr Jean Swanson and I attended the first meetingabout a year ago, and since then Cllr Geoff Heathcock has represented Queen Edith’s on that group.

The County officers have visited twice, once to our South Area meeting at my request and again to meet residents in Queen Edith’s. It was made very clear that people were impatient with the long delays and looking for solutions soon.

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