“Addenbrooke’s is a big hospital: world scale, world class.”

The special measures imposed by the CQC inspectors on Addenbrooke’s Hospital were the subject of a question at the Cambridgeshire County Council meeting this week (14th Ocotber).

Cllr David Jenkins

The chair of the County Council’s Health Scrutiny committee is Histon councillor David Jenkins, who sits next to me on the Lib Dem benches.

David spoke up for Addenbrooke’s and commended the many positive aspects of its recent inspection that didn’t make the deadlines: the outstanding compassionate care of staff and the hospital’s clinical excellence.

This is what he said:

“Thank you for the question Ian and thank you for the advance notice.

Before I respond let me give a little background.
The Commission for Quality Care, (CQC), conducted a regular inspection of Cambridge University Hospitals Trust, I’ll refer to that as Addenbrooke’s, earlier this year. The inspection resulted in declaring Addenbrooke’s overall as inadequate and so the hospital has been placed in special measures.
The outcome of the inspection the was presented at an NHS ‘quality summit’ in September. During its presentation the CQC made it clear that, although the judgement was clear and appropriate, the compassionate care given by staff was rated as outstanding, and there were several examples of clinical excellence of the hospital. Addenbrookes is no mid-Staffs and it’s only the change in the inspection regime which has resulted in the two hospitals having the same rating.
CQC highlighted staff shortage, the impact of the EPIC implementation, a disconnect between operations and the board and poor medicines management. It’s also worth noting that the hospital was rated good on services for children and young people.
With respect to this council’s response I’m sure you appreciate that it has no executive authority where NHS trusts are concerned although through the NHS scrutiny role of the Health Committee it can challenge and otherwise show leadership. This is what we’ve done.
Shortly after the announcement the Director of Public Health and I met to consider it. Our main concern was that the health sector at large in Cambridgeshire, the CCG, other trusts and ourselves, should recognise that the Addenbrookes problem was our problem and that we shoud all be working together to address it with a view to Addenbrookes coming out of special measures as soon as possible.
We are satisfied that that is the case. The local NHS chief executives meet regularly and Addenbrookes is part of the discussions at their meeting. The common attitude was summed up by the CCG’s press release after the announcement in which is noted the strong negatives of the CQC judgement but at the same time highlighted Addenbrookes’ strengths.
Futhermore we have been talking to key contacts to ensure that they share this attitude. I have met the chairs of two of the trusts, including Addenbrookes itself, and will shortly be meeting with the chair of the CCG.
And finally as a part of its regular program of scrutiny the Health Committee will be scrutinising the Addenbrookes’ response to the CQC judgement in November. This will be attended by the CSC, Addenbrookes and the CCG.”

Giving it up for Romsey Mill

My employer, Cambridge University Press, is a partner of Romsey Mill, and I thought I would tell you about their seasonal appeal.

Romsey Mill is a charity that helps young people all over Cambridgeshire: it’s a Christian charity, but you don’t have to be a Christian to want to help!

This is what they have to say: (more…)

A council grant for your group – apply in September, enjoy in 2013

Cambridge City Council gives community development and leisure grants to community groups, sports teams, social clubs, residents’ associations etc. The money could help with events, equipment or outings.

Here is a list of the types of organization and activity that attract grant funding:
  • Organisations that provide activities and services to people who are disadvantaged or marginalised by their social or economic circumstances
  • Organisations that enable people to improve their own well being and participate in their communities
  • Organisations that enable people to participate in making decisions and influence the services that affect their lives
  • Activities which increase people’s awareness of the city’s cultural diversity, and provides opportunities to celebrate it
  • Activities which bring people together to identify common issues and bring about positive changes in their communities
  • High levels of user involvement in identifying local needs and developing projects which respond to those needs
  • Organisations which develop and deliver sustainable solutions to social and economic challenges

Grants for Queen Edith’s, Cherry Hinton and Trumpington are assessed by the Cambridgeshire Community Foundation, which makes recommendations to councillors at the South Area Committee, which meets approximately every two months. The next deadline is 30th September and the grants will be decided in December.

For more information on grants, and to download forms and eligibility rules, see the Council’s website or download a leaflet here: AC publicity leaflet

Contact the Cambridgeshire Community Foundation on Cambridge 410535.